City Tavern from Culver City to Open Flagship Location at FIGat7th in Downtown LA

A new flagship location for City Tavern (from Culver City) will be opening this fall 2013 at FIGat7th in Downtown LA

A new flagship location for City Tavern (from Culver City) will be opening this fall 2013 at FIGat7th in Downtown LA

Earlier this month, we saw the huge crowds and long lines that now regularly inundate the new FIGat7th food court called TASTE during the busy lunch hours. Even so, most downtowners expressed that they want to see that high energy carried over into the dinner hours as well. That goal will now be one step closer to realization as a popular Culver City eatery called City Tavern — located adjacent to the Kirk Douglas Theatre — will be opening their second location at TASTE, which will have a prominent lounge space for after-work and late-night gatherings.

Located directly next to George’s Greek Grill on the lower level, this will be City Tavern’s flagship restaurant at 4,000 square feet. Known for their comfort food with a California-centric bent, hand-crafted cocktails, boutique wines, and a revolving selection of local craft beers on tap, the founders of City Tavern — Ken Kaufman, Brian McKeaney, and David Northrup — describe their restaurant as “the new American tavern.”

“During our lengthy search for a second City Tavern location, we looked for a place where we could build the same sense of community we established in Culver City,” said Ken Kaufman. “We believe FIGat7th — an urban crossroads where people live, work, and shop — is the ideal spot.”

City Tavern has served over 1,200 different brews and beer pairing dinners are a common occurrence at their Culver City location. The Executive Chef, Jessica Christensen, prepares tapas style plates that are meant to be matched with specific beers.

City Tavern will begin construction soon with a projected opening in fall 2013.

19 Responses to City Tavern from Culver City to Open Flagship Location at FIGat7th in Downtown LA

  1. Talk about worlds colliding…

    My office moves from DTLA to Culver City just as the Expo Line opens to take me there, then Public School 612 opens a new location “Public School 310″ a block away from my office in Culver City, then one of our favorite spots by the office opens a new location back in DTLA near home.

    Wild.

  2. I really hope this helps Taste during the evening hours as it’s an absolute dead zone in there..

    Though I find it highly unlikely that Taste will keep its evening hours through fall.. Damn it downtown is aggravating.

  3. Downtown Darling

    It would be a miracle if this was “one step closer to realization” and not 3 steps back, say like… Urbano, Figaro Bistrot or The Well.

    It has been so dismaying to see business come to downtown and fail within months either because downtown residents abhor gentrification or the downtown workforce sees it as nothing more than a place to work. A sense of community is exactly what DTLA needs for ALL occupants, both residents and workers alike.

    I can only hope that more retail comes to FIGat7th ASAP to make it a legitimate destination spot instead of a convenience for the corporate lunch hour. Other than City Target, what is the attraction to a lower-level food court when people have obvious franchise options at Staples Center or the only bona fide DTLA destination restaurant, Bottega Louie to choose from?

    • What makes a DTLA destination restaurant in your opinion? Just curious because Coco Laurent could use a little assistance along with Figaro.

  4. downtown resident

    Yes I would like to know what FIGat7th is doing about retail? WHY IS IT TAKING SO LONG?!

    At least make some annoucements on what stores are planning to open there…

    This needs to happen ASAP.

  5. Great restaurant. .great news! I went to FigAt7 on Sunday for lunch, and the only food spot open was Melt. Are all the others closed on Sundays? It was around 3pm.

  6. Downtown Darling, if you think that Bottega Louie is DTLA’s only destination restaurant, I think you have a little homework to do Sweetness.

    • Downtown Darling

      Can you name a few? Or even one other? I’m talking about core DTLA, not Little Tokyo or Arts District (essentially Church & State, which even then is off the beaten path).

      I have yet to come across anyone from outside of DTLA that knows of a restaurant other than Bottega Louie. Other thriving spots like Perch, Parish, Baco Mercat, Mas Malo are consistently full of downtown residents, but they’re a far cry from “destination” spots.

      As a DTLA resident and worker, I don’t think there is any homework to be done, Sweetness. Maybe if you ever left Spring Street, you would realize there isn’t much sense of community at all.

        • First of all, Bon Appetite named Baco Mercat one of the best new restaurants in America. If you care about food, you will know about Baco Marcat.

          Second, I feel like some commenters here have a bit of a tendency to lose perspective. It is simple not possible, or even necessary, for every single street and neighborhood to be lined with bumping restaurants. That is true for even the most vibrant walking cities in the world. In New York, no one eats dinner at Wall Street. In Paris, no one eats dinner at La Defense. In Singapore, no one eats dinner in the CBD. People hang out and eat in the neighborhoods, just like they do in LA.

          But even more important, why is everyone so obsessed with destination restaurants? True livability comes from neighborhood joints. And we have so many amazing places in Little Tokyo, the Art District and along Spring Street. Instead of being obsessed with glass towers and destination restaurants, we should be obsessed with human scale and livability. Yes, we have long ways to go. But all in all, I think DTLA is on an amazing path.

          • Totally agree. If anything, we need less destinations and cheaper, but still good options that cater to the everyday needs of downtown residents.

        • downtown resident

          I totally disagree with Hunter and “Downtown Darling”. There are plenty of places that are core DTLA destinations. I can name several off the top of my head, Mo-Chica, Eat.Drink.Americano, THE GORBALS!, The Parish, Umamicatessen, Figaro, Daikokuya, Wurstküche. Most of the people I know outside of downtown know of these places. They know that downtown is a restaurant hub. Can I ask why you wouldn’t include Little Tokyo or the Arts District in you version of “core DTLA”? Are we limiting ourselves to a few blocks now?

      • I live and work downtown as well, and while I agree with some of your comments, I think you’re wrong in others. Perch is anything but locals, and the line is long with DTLA’s answer to B&T. Baco is super popular outside dtla and difficult to get into without reservations. Ever try to go to Wurstkuche on the weekend? Yes it’s in the arts district, but you threw it out there. Industriel is always pretty busy as is the Water Grill (which is anything but a local place). Umamicatessan is drawing well too and is very destinationy. People outside of downtown are always asking me if I’ve gone to this place or that yet. People like to come here and try these places out.

        I’m not sure what restaurant popularity has to do with community, but I find a lot of community here. It’s a friendly neighborhood for the most part, although that probably depends on where you live. And btw, I don’t live on Spring.

        That said, we desperately need more retail of all kinds and levels here and I wish 7th&Fig would announce beyond Sports Chalet, if there is anything to announce that is. And I do think City Tavern is a great addition.

  7. The problem with TASTE is that from street level, you can’t tell whether it’s open. Who would even know that the Melt is open on Sundays? It’s tucked way inside and you’d have to go all the way downstairs to check. Not good for anyone who’s just walking by, or even people who are at Target a level above (unless you go downstairs to get to the parking garage).

    Downtown Darling has a good point– I feel like there are only a select few places that are known to “outsiders” — maybe less than a third of the great places we residents know are here.

    As for residents– a lot of people still drive when they go out to eat, even downtown, and many of these places have limited parking options, or are just isolated (nothing else to check out nearby before or after your meal).

    Places need to do more outreach to residents– flyers/mailers, signage– so they don’t just stick to their regulars or what’s within a two block radius.

  8. Very hard to get excited bout a food court in a mall.

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