downtown los angeles, financial district
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Construction Watch: Downtown LA’s 22-Story “8th/Hope Apartment Tower” Halfway Done

Corner of 8th and Hope: A new 22-story high-rise apartment tower is now about half way done with a completion slated for 2014

Corner of 8th and Hope: A new 22-story high-rise apartment tower is now about half way done with a completion slated for 2014

Okay, so we all know now that Downtown LA is in the midst of another impressive building boom with at least a half dozen high-rises under construction including the ginormous 73-floor Wilshire Grand Tower slated for completion in early 2017 (the West Coast’s tallest new tower in the making). Out of the half dozen, another one of those exciting new high-rises under construction is the 22-story apartment tower rising at the southwest corner of 8th and Hope on the northern edge of South Park (right across from the future Macy’s Plaza $160 million makeover). National development company, Wood Partners, is developing the residential high-rise project.

Currently, the residential tower is about half-way complete working on the 13th floor (out of 22 floors total). A row of new windows have been added to the second residential floor on the 7th floor just above the parking podium.

When it’s completed in mid-to-late 2014, 290 apartments for rent with another 5,000 square feet of ground floor retail space will be added to the corner, helping to activate this desolate intersection.

Wood Partners is currently looking for a high quality tenant like Dean & Deluca to take over the ground floor space, which could be very complementary to the Whole Foods being built only a block away.

The residential tower is still nameless even though most people (about 1/3) seem to prefer the name “Glass House Los Angeles” according to a DTLA Rising survey completed last year.

When completed in 2014, 8th and Hope will be a substantial positive addition to the burgeoning South Park community

A view up Hope Street: When completed in 2014, 8th and Hope will be a substantial positive addition to the burgeoning South Park community

The first row of windows have been added to the first residential level (on the 6th floor) just above the parking podium

The first row of windows have been added to the second residential level (on the 7th floor) just above the parking podium

An updated rendering of the 8th and Hope project in Downtown LA (Photo: The Preston Partnership)

An updated rendering of the 8th and Hope project in Downtown LA (Photo: The Preston Partnership)

19 Comments

  1. Jonah says

    Do you know what the deal with the parking podium is? Will it be glassed in on one front, but not the other?

  2. sebastian says

    If Downtown had a few dozen of these now, DT would look so attractive.

  3. I doubt it is going to be glassed in – need airflow all around a podium parking

    • Jonah says

      Sure, but you can obviously solve ventilation issues without ugly gaping cement holes. Clearly, people in underground parking don’t all suffocate :)

  4. I’m happy to see all this new construction, but I wish they would not impede pedestrian traffic as this project has. They did build a passageway to compensate for the vanished sidewalk on Hope St., but the 8th St. side has been unusable for months. Another culprit: the Broad Collection up on Grand.

  5. I’d never really taken a close look at the most recent rendering of the project until now. They’ve done a great job concealing the podium, assuming reality turns out anything like the image above.

  6. raymond3000 says

    Looks like preliminary work is also starting on the facade of Macys parking structure in the background, cool!! IMO, 8th/hope building is kinda bland but makes great infill for the area!

    • Regarding Macys…They are washing off that stupid bubble girl ad on the parking structure

  7. david says

    DTLA, so far, has failed to see a single high rise residential building of real architectural distinction… and this one breaks no new ground. We’re talking about 40 years of botched attempts (if not utter failures) starting with Bunker Hill Towers and running right into APEX. One might think that LA – entertainment capital of the West – would be ripe for cutting-edge highrise design, but alas… we get tall buildings that are better suited for Des Moines or Jacksonville. Curious….

    • LAofAnaheim says

      Hmmm…..the Ritz Carlton is an architectural gem of glass at 54 floors. That building looks stunning.

  8. david says

    The Ritz tower is a mixed use development which is mostly hotel space, not residential. Yes, it’s architecturally striking – though kind of “Vegas” like and not something you’d expect to see in a real city like New York or Chicago. I like the Ritz simply because, as the ONLY tall skyscraper built in DTLA in 20 years, it makes the rest of the skyline look absolutely old fashioned.

    • Jonah says

      Real charged language there – “real city.” I’d say the building is definitely glitzy, but most major cities have some new hotels in that same vein.

      • David says

        By “real city” I mean one where the city center is the heart of business, culture, entertainment and the undeniable core of civic life and identity. It is a place where a great many people live and work and shop, and where people love to gather in public spaces that the city takes great pride in. It’s a place that defines the city…. A place people come to from all over the world to experience. A place of parks and museums and streets that form a coherent whole. I hope it’s not too “charged” to say none of that describes DTLA.

  9. david says

    btw, no one is as thrilled as I to see the new energy and great promise that permeates DTLA today. I’ve been waiting for this moment in time for 45 years! Perhaps the new Korea Air Tower and other developments (many of them small scale) will put DTLA “over the hump” and provoke people into thinking of the area as a “real city” at last.

  10. The 8th/Hope structure has the best exterior look for above ground parking I have ever seen. I’m at the adjacent Market Lofts facing Flower Street. I look directly at the Watermarke garage which is hideous. The random hunks of concrete make it look unfinished. It would be better if the hunks are removed. I heard some time ago the Watermarke was going to improve the look but nothing yet.

  11. Pingback: Los Angeles Housing Supply Must Grow to Keep Prices Under Control | Urban One

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