Mystery Unfolding: Plywood Removed, Mattresses Delivered at Trinity Auditorium in Downtown LA

The Trinity Auditorium is slated to become a boutique hotel, but a definitive timeline remains a mystery

The Trinity Auditorium is slated to become a boutique hotel, but a definitive timeline remains a mystery

The mystery that surrounds the historic Trinity Auditorium continues (like its mysterious cousin the Hotel Clark near Pershing Square). New York-based Chetrit Group, who owns the Trinity located at 9th/Grand, has mostly shied away from media providing little information about future development plans for the historic edifice (once destined to become the Gansevoort West Hotel from NY’s Meatpacking District). We all know that it still involves a hotel project, but we have no idea what the timeline is or what it’s going to look like, etc. But little by little, some information has been revealed overtime that provides a somewhat clearer picture of what’s happening at the Trinity. For instance, in 2011 signs pointed to a King & Grove Hotel as the potential new brand for the Trinity. Then in 2012, a Notice of Public Hearing said the Trinity would actually be named “Empire Hotel” and would come with 183 rooms and a rooftop pool and bar. Now just this week, the plywood that boarded up the windows along the sidewalk, for what seemed like an eternity, has been removed revealing new windows behind.

Construction crews were seen yesterday working on the ground floor polishing the windows and metal doors. Because the windows are now fully exposed, anyone walking by can see inside the lobby, which is still pretty much an empty and unfinished concrete shell. However, there is reason to believe that the upper floors are probably much further along than the lobby because, again, when you walk by the Trinity at night along 9th Street, some upper floor windows are lit up from the inside where you can clearly see new wallpaper and sconces against the wall in the hallway. Also, brand new mattresses have been delivered this week and a few spotted being stored in the lobby, which means the rooms are taking shape. But then again, new mattresses were seen stored in Chetrit Group’s other hotel project, Hotel Clark, in Oct 2011 and that’s still not open to this day.

But something tells me we’re closer now to finding out what’s going on with the Trinity Auditorium than ever before.

This week, plywood was removed from the ground floor windows of the Trinity Auditorium and mattresses were also seen delivered into this mysterious hotel project at 9th/Grand

This week, plywood was removed from the ground floor windows of the Trinity Auditorium and mattresses were also seen delivered into this mysterious hotel project at 9th/Grand

All plywood have been removed from the windows covering the ground floor of the Trinity Auditorium

All plywood have been removed from the windows covering the ground floor of the Trinity Auditorium

After plywood removal, workers have been seen doing construction on the exterior metal doors

After plywood removal, workers have been seen doing construction on the exterior metal doors

New mattresses have been delivered this week with some seen stored in lobby

New mattresses have been delivered this week with some seen stored in lobby

Construction crews were seen this week actively working on discarding demo debris

Construction crews were seen this week actively working on discarding demo debris

A peek inside the beautiful lobby with new celiing paint and pendant lighting

A peek inside the beautiful lobby with new ceiling paint and pendant lighting

12 Responses to Mystery Unfolding: Plywood Removed, Mattresses Delivered at Trinity Auditorium in Downtown LA

  1. It’s a gorgeous old building. I hope they unveil their project soon, it’s a shame for it to sit empty for so long.

  2. This means that I will, once again, be kicked out of the parking lot that I park in lol. How fun.

  3. I would love to see one of the historic theaters be turned into a book store.

    • Cannot be more agree with Sebastian… it would be amazing if any could turn into an independent book store. But seems like hotel and apt are priority for current dt developers.

  4. 3-year-old mattresses. Just… sitting there. One would think that purchase would be further down the to-do list.

  5. are we ever not closer now to finding out what’s going on with the Trinity Auditorium than ever before?

  6. Screw Chetrit and their crap. They’re sitting on some of downtown’s best properties and doing nothing. They could care less about downtown or ever opening their buildings. Their redo of Clark was a joke and still sits closed.

  7. Don’t buy into their crap and don’t get excited. This property will look the same in 2016. Sorry, but their track record should be proof enough. These owners are the worst in DTLA, 3 of their buildings sit empty after decades of disrepair and two booming cycles, and they want $1000 psf for their land (across the street from Trinity).

    We should not give them a lick of media.

  8. What kind of developer works this way (so mysterious and taking forever) to open a project???
    I’ve never seen a developer work like the Chetrit Group.
    Perhaps the snail-paced activity is meant to be speculative to drive up price the sell so they can sell it??
    Is it just front for tax purposes??
    Makes NO sense.

  9. They’re not really a group, just some uber wealthy family. I live near the Clark and sometimes at night a limo would pull up and these total 70’s pimp type dudes would get of limos in the garage. Very freakin weird. The never talk to the media, there’s a labor dispute around the Clark, totally secretive and very shady. I wish they’d just sell their stuff and keep their sleezy asses in new york.

  10. The Chetrit Group also owns Giannini Place on the NW corner of 7th and Olive. The building was the originally the Bank of Italy, predecessor to the Bank of America, founded by Amadeo Pietro Giannini who was legendary as an humanitarian for offering banking services to Italian immigrants and later to farmers throughout California. In the mid 80’s the Chetrit Group did a beautiful job of restoring the exterior of the first floor with meticulous details true to the original design, including new windows and refurbishing the stunning gold entry doors (sound familiar?). As with the Trinity, they then just left the building to the elements without a first floor tenant so today one would never guess what a beautiful building it had been. My understanding is the group’s L.A. holdings are for tax advantage for its NY holdings.

    • Don’t even get me started on Giannini. What a beautiful building and a total shame. I think the city should come up with some kind of rule system that buildings like Giannini and the Trinity can be labeled historical landmarks (or some kind of architectural distinction) and with that go two options to owners. 1 – Develop it, 2 – Sell it. If they fail to do either in a given time frame, serious financial penalties ensue. The key is to make it not worth it to these people to hold on to them in their current condition. Conversely, give owners who do progress with their properties greater tax breaks or some other kind of financial incentives.

      It’s not just Chetrit either who’s like this. There are loads of great buildings on Broadway with owners who don’t give a shit.

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