downtown los angeles, south park

New Hope Street Parklet Installed in Downtown LA’s South Park

South Park's growing community continues with the installation of the district's first urban parklet at 11th and Hope

One of the hottest districts in Downtown LA just got another little “urban boost” today. Within all the frenetic construction activity happening throughout South Park, the immediate neighborhood surrounding 11th and Hope has organically developed to become the center of the growing residential community, and today marked another great milestone with the opening of a brand new parklet installed by the South Park BID.

As the name would suggest, a “parklet” is a miniature version of a community gathering spot, and what better location to put one in South Park than along Hope Street in front of a slew of new businesses helping to support the continuation of that critical economic growth. And it may not be very big, but its installation today is symbolic of a growing community that demands a more sophisticated urban neighborhood.

The new parklet — a project made possible by a public-private collaboration of 15 different sponsors and partners including the LADOT, South Park BID, and developer Mack Urban — replaced about two parking spaces with a new slice of public space that encourages people to linger (outside their cars) and interact more creatively with the urban landscape. I always see parklets as an optimistic sign that the underlying community does, in fact, value pedestrians.

Designed by two downtown firms, SODA Architects and Mia Lehrer & Associates, the modern looking parklet features a variety of seating (tables and chairs, benches sourced from sustainable wood), locally-fabricated metals, and drought-tolerant succulent plants. In addition, the South Park BID’s characteristic green color is used to accent the parklet’s metal features.

By 2018, South Park’s residential population is expected to increase to about 19,000. As that number continues to rise, the district will continue to evolve with hopefully pedestrians and bicyclists as the number one priority. Some other exciting projects are in store for the immediate area surrounding 11th and Hope including the upcoming MyFigueroa project, which will give 11th Street a road diet, as well as another exciting pedestrian enhancing feature along Hope Street.

This is Downtown LA’s third parklet with two others installed on Spring Street in early 2013.

The DTLA community celebrates the opening of South Park's first parklet

The DTLA community celebrates the opening of South Park’s first parklet

Hope St Parklet is surrounded by a growing community here at 11th and Hope

Hope St Parklet is surrounded by a growing community here at 11th and Hope

Please don't litter or let your pet go potty here

Please don’t litter or let your pet go potty here

The new parklet encourages you to linger a bit and enjoy the city

The new parklet encourages you to linger a bit and enjoy the city

Sustainable-sourced wood used to make these benches in the parklet

Sustainable-sourced wood used to make these benches in the parklet

The new parklet is installed along Hope Street in South Park

The new parklet is installed along Hope Street in South Park

The new parklet helps support the new slew of businesses opening along Hope Street in South Park

The new parklet helps support the new slew of businesses opening along Hope Street in South Park

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5 Comments

  1. Edward thompson says

    I wish they could have, and perhaps they still plan on, relocated the giant electric box that sits right in front of this “parklet”. If the cost is prohibitive, maybe they could wrap it with a garden or park scape mural. I was at the parklet today, and it is kind of an eye-sore. Or if they had just moved the parklet south a space or two, they whole box could have been completely avoided.

    • corner soul says

      Perhaps someone from the Dept. of DIY will paint a mini-mural on it, free of charge.

      • julietrevino says

        Or just paint it blue or red the way London does with utility structures. More importantly, I hope they lower the speed limit to minimize accidents. I’m still uncomfortable just looking at people sitting that close to cars whisking by.

        • corner soul says

          From a traffic engineering perspective, this’ll probably calm speeding on that block more than any signage ever could. Good idea about simply painting these utility boxes a less drab color… of course if the city is in charge of things, it’ll end up costing like $3,000, hehe.

  2. I’m just wondering how long until those (no zone) items appear.

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